African erosion surface
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African erosion surface a continental-scale synthesis of geomorphology, tectonics, and environmental change over the past 180 million years by Kevin Burke

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Published by Geological Society of America in Boulder, Colo .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Geology, Structural -- Africa,
  • Erosion -- Africa,
  • Physical geography -- Africa,
  • Morphotectonics -- Africa,
  • Evolutionary paleoecology -- Africa

Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references.

Statementby Kevin Burke, Yanni Gunnell.
ContributionsGunnell, Yanni, 1965-
Classifications
LC ClassificationsQE635 .B87 2008
The Physical Object
Paginationp. cm.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL16523407M
ISBN 109780813712017
LC Control Number2008006912

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The African Erosion Surface: A Continental-Scale Synthesis of Geomorphology, Tectonics, and Environmental Change over the Past Million Years. The African Surface is a composite surface of continental extent that developed as a result of erosion following two episodes of the initiation of ocean fl oor accretion around Afro-Arabia ca. The African Erosion Surface: A Continental-scale Synthesis of Geomorphology, Tectonics, and Environmental Change over the Past Million Years (GSA Memoir ) | Kevin Burke, Yanni Gunnell | download | B–OK. Download books for free. Find books. Two episodes of continental breakup and the formation of ocean floor were followed by erosion that reduced the continent to a low-elevation and low-relief African Surface by Late Cretaceous times. Africa's present-day topography developed mostly during the past 30 million years as the African Surface underwent swell uplift and climate changed.

Stanford Libraries' official online search tool for books, media, journals, databases, government documents and more. The African erosion surface: a continental-scale synthesis of geomorphology, tectonics, and environmental change over the past million years in SearchWorks catalog. surface areas classified as having a moderate to high erosion risk (where the average annual soil loss rate exceeds 12 t/), the Eastern Cape (6 km 2) is the most severely affected province, followed by the Free State (5 km 2), Northern Cape (5. Buy The African Erosion Surface: A Continental-Scale Synthesis of Geomorphology, Tectonics, and Environmental Change over the Past Million Years by Burke, Kevin (ISBN:) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible : Kevin Burke. Hence, there is a highly complicated, diverse, and abundant literature on Africa planation surfaces. 53,55–62 For instance, Ollier and Marker 63 reanalyzed King’s African Surface type area in South Africa, and instead of seeing five or six erosion surfaces, they concluded there were only two. 64 There was a high upper ‘paleoplain’ at.

  Photographs of key erosion features and processes in the study area (a) surface ponding due to low soil infiltration capacity, (b) grass root pedestal indicative of sheet erosion, (c) cattle track along a topographic flow convergence line, (d) deep 'gully' incision along flow convergence lines (Images University of Plymouth/Carey Marks). The African Surface or African Erosion Surface is a land surface formed by erosion covering large swathes of Africa. The type area of the surface lies in South Africa where the surface was first identified as such by Lester Charles King in the midth century.. The term was coined by King for certain high surfaces in southern the years he redefined it various times leaving some. Rill erosion can be reduced by reducing the volume and speed of surface water with grassed waterways and filter strips, ripped mulch lines, and contour drains. Rill erosion is often described as the intermediate stage between sheet erosion and gully erosion. Gully erosion .   The Problem Today. Currently, 40% of soil in Africa is degraded. Degraded soil diminishes food production and leads to soil erosion, which in turn contributes to is particularly worrisome since, according to the UN's Food and Agriculture Organization, some 83% of sub-Saharan African people depend on the land for their livelihood, and food production in Africa will .